News

Episode 14: Rob Auton – Poetry in People, Houseplants and Paper Balls

Rob Auton talks about how he finds poetry in unexpected places. Writing about the everyday, finding beauty in the mundane keeps his fascination with the world alive. He talks about the shows he has written on subjects including water, the sky, sleep and yellow. He also offers an exercise on writing poetry inspired by everyday objects.

Rob is currently touring the Time show – his eighth consecutive Edinburgh Fringe show and is also developing this year’s Fringe show about crowds. On top of that he is releasing a daily podcast where you can hear poems, monologues and stories each day in his inimitable style.

Join Rob as he shares a few of his poems and offers the following exercise to help you find poetry somewhere you might not think of looking:

Go to Argos, open a catalogue and point to an item at random them write a poem about it. Try to write something however uninspiring it may seem. Free write, try word association think of memories, places, people and activities that the item makes you think of. Let your mind wonder and see where it takes you. Then share your poem on social media using #poetrynonstop or by email and lets see if between us we can create a complete Argos catalogue of poems. You can hear Patrick’s response in the form of a riddle on the podcast.

www.robauton.co.uk

Rob Auton – Gravel Travel

Performance poet and comedian Rob Auton finds poetry in the small, the mundane and the everyday things we take for granted. He will be talking about his writing and performances and the shows he has been performing at the Edinburgh Fringe and nationwide for the last eight years. You can also hear his daily musings on the aptly named Rob Auton Daily Podcast.

Episode 13: Fay Roberts – Poet in Residence

Cambridge-based poet Fay Roberts was recently appointed poet in residence at Peterborough Market for the Syntax Poetry Festival. They became intimately acquainted with the people and history of this place they came to see as still being at the heart of the city if sometimes undervalued. The experience has spurred them on to bring poetry to a wider audience and to places it doesn’t usually belong especially in Cambridge where they have been the driving force behind a thriving poetry and spoken word scene for many years.

Fay talks about their experiences of the residency and shares some of the poems they wrote. They also offer a writing exercise to get anyone writing a poem about anything – or lemons in the first instance.

  1. Set a timer for two minutes and write as many words and phrases you associate with the word Lemons. There are no “correct” associations! And if your mind springs off into other associations from those associated words and phrases, write those down as well.
  2. Review your list/ paragraph/ three words/ scrawl. Anything else to add to your toolkit? Take one minute maximum to do that.
  3. Set a timer for ten minutes and start writing, using the words and phrases in your toolkit. Let yourself write freely, just as you did during the toolkit section – this is your poem, and there’s no “correct” way for it to be. Be sure to check your timer occasionally so that you know when it’s time to start rounding off what you’re writing
  4. Review your poem/ microfiction/ anecdote/ epic ode to citrus. Does it need anything to finish it off, or is it done now? Take two minutes maximum to roughly polish, chop, and round it off.
  5. Congratulations! You have written a new piece. It took you fifteen minutes and it’s pretty damned good, if you say so yourself. And you now have a simple technique to get you started when you have something specific that you want/ need to write about.

So, when life gives you lemons write poetry! You can hear how Patrick got on at the end of the podcast and as always please share your own responses by email here or on social media using #poetrynonstop.

Fay Roberts – Blissful Chance

This week I welcome poet, storyteller, musician and registered logophile Fay Roberts to the podcast. Fay is at the heart of the poetry and spoken word scene in Cambridge, endlessly creating opportunities for poets to perform and publish their work. They are also a prolific writer and performer with strong reputation on the national scene having performed at Edinburgh Fringe, Glastonbury Festival and Hammer and Tongue National Finals to name a few.

Enjoy this performance blending words and music before tuning into the podcast to hear Fay talk about their latest projects and read some new poems.

Episode 12: Wesley Freeman Smith – The Art of Collaboration

Picture: Jules Leaño

Writing can be a lonely business but collaboration has always been at the heart of Wesley Freeman Smith’s practice. The Cambridge-based writer and artist began promoting events which brought together musicians, poets and visual artists in churches, basements and other grand and modest venues to perform, collaborate and share their creativity side-by-side.
From promoting others work he has stepped up to the mic himself on his latest project Catching Shadows a collaboration between himself and musician Theresa Elflein. Their debut release Fuse features Wesley’s abstract poetry set to music provided by guest collaborator Anna Schuschu.
Wesley talks about his latest project and working with artists across borders – artistic and geographical – to create art which is more than the sum of its parts.

Wesley also invites you to write a poem in response to one or more of these images he sourced for a ghost story writing project. You can hear a couple of his poems and one written by Patrick. Please share your own on social media using #poetrynonstop or via email here.

If you have enjoyed this podcast please help fund more episodes by donating via Patreon or Paypal. All contributions gratefully received.

Catching Shadows x Anna SchuSchu – Fuse

This week poet and artist Wesley Freeman-Smith talks about recent projects and the works he has created and curated through collaboration with artists working across a variety of discipline. His latest project Catching Shadows sees him sharing his poetry for the first time on a series of spoken word tracks accompanied by music from Leipzig-based experimental pop artist Anna SchuSchu with production from fellow Leipzig-based musician Theresa Elflein. The three artists shared recordings back and forth across the border ‘like pass the parcel’. You can listen to the results on debut EP Fuse now.

Episode 11: Luke Wright – 20 years on stage

Luke Wright Picture: Andrew Florides

Luke Wright was a Blur fan and budding band frontman like so many of us in his teens. It was seeing Ross Sutherland and John Cooper Clarke perform poetry that set him on the path to a career in poetry. While he rejects the term performance poet he has excelled both in writing and performing. His poetry and blistering stage presence has impressed audiences around the world. As he put the finishing touches to his latest play The Remains of Logan Dankworth, Luke took time to look back on the first 20 years of his career sharing anecdotes and insights which are sure to inspire all poets, writers and performers. He also shares a few new poems.

For a writing prompt Luke challenges you to write a poem in 15 minutes:

Pick a word/phrase at random from a book. You don’t have to go with the first one you pick, but don’t spend all night on it, have three goes perhaps. Once you have your word or phrase set a clock for 15 minutes. In that time write a complete first draft of a poem. 

You can hear one of Luke’s poems that started from this speedwriting technique and find out how far Patrick got writing a poem in 15 minutes.

As always please share your poems which maybe featured on the blog or podcast. You can send them here.

www.lukewright.co.uk

If you have enjoyed this podcast please help fund more episodes by donating via Patreon or Paypal. All contributions gratefully received.

Luke Wright – Ron’s Knock-Off Shop

Coming up this week Luke Wright looks back on 20 years in the poetry business from discovering spoken word through a love of Blur and seeing Ross Sutherland and John Cooper Clarke perform to taking his own shows to Edinburgh and around the world. Here’s Luke in action showing his lyrical skills with a univocalism – a poem written using only one vowel, in this case O.

www.lukewright.co.uk

Luke Wright Picture: Andrew Florides 

Episode 10: Michael Brown – Poems in Pictures and Pictures in Poems

Michael Brown by Thom Atkinson

Cambridge-based poet Michael Brown discusses ekphrastic poetry. He reads poems inspired by various pictures and other artworks particularly the work of Francis Bacon. Michael explains how he translates pictures into words and invites listeners to write an ekphrastic poem:

Go to a gallery or find a piece of artwork that really speaks volumes to you in an art book. Perhaps wonder in the gallery first then read what you can about the piece and have it visually present when you write. The traditional way would be to recreate the image or imagery through the written word. However whatever the piece inspires let the poem take you to where it needs to.

Patrick responds to the prompt with a poem inspired by Melancholy III by Edvard Munch.

Please share your ekphrastic poems via email or on social media using #poetrynonstop. Please also use the same hash tag to share pictures which would be good for ekphrastic poems. Who knows what poems they might inspire.

Michael also reads poems from his upcoming collection Meet Me at the Harbour which evoke memorable images with a few well chosen words.

Michael Brown was born in Manchester in 1983. He completed Meet Me at the Harbour whilst staying in his favourite place in the world, Charlestown, Cornwall, and in lighthouses owned by Trinity House. He lives in Cambridge with his husband and their adopted son. Michael is currently working on his short novel on climate change The Cage.

poetbrownie.com

If you have enjoyed this episode please help me make more by donating via Patreon or Paypal. All contributions gratefully received.

Michael Brown – 200 Buttons

Michael Brown by Thom Atkinson

Coming up this week Michael Brown talks about ekphrastic poetry and reads from his upcoming collection Meet Me at the Harbour.

Here is a poem inspired by an exhibit in the Queer British Art at Tate Britain exhibition.

200 buttons
for Richard Chopping and Denis Worth Miller
Queer British Art at Tate Britain

Local legend has it
that every time a soldier pays a ‘visit’
they collect from him a button
stored in an old Christmas biscuit tin.

Bohemia round here is like
a fat man with eyebrows like furry caterpillars and an oily voice
so Richard said on the phone to Francis Bacon.

Denis was a cute little button
he’d spend his days painting boys down at the cruising ground.

They invited me to their house in Cornwall
and I spent summer writing poems in the harbour
and undoing many buttons.

Michael Brown