Episode 27: Ramona Herdman – Drafting and redrafting

Ramona Herdman

Any serious poet knows the importance of redrafting. A poem can go through numerous drafts and change beyond recognition from the first jottings in a notebook to final published piece. It is also a difficult practice which takes time and effort to develop. It can be hard to see how to improve poems which either seem to be finished or failed attempts.

On this podcast Ramona Herdman talks about how her poem ‘My name is Legion: for we are many’ started off as drafts of two quite different poems. It went on to win the Hamish Canham Prize in 2017.

She also shares some poems from her latest pamphlet ‘A warm and snouting thing’, published by The Emma Press in September 2019 and shortlisted for the 2020 East Anglian Book Awards.

Ramona’s exercise for revisiting draft poems

Choose two existing draft poems that aren’t quite working – find one where you like something about the form and another where you like something about the content/subject matter and try to combine them somehow into one. There should be an element of surprise that they’re not both about the same thing, but there is some way of making the two subjects speak to each other.

Alternatively, if there is a subject you’ve been trying to write about for a while but haven’t got where you wanted, review your existing draft poems on that subject, note down a few of the best lines/phrases/images and then try to combine them to make a new poem. Or take a set form (a sonnet, rhyming quatrains, a ballad) and write a completely new poem on the subject, but being led by the form.

This podcast regularly invites you to try writing new poems so this is a great opportunity to develop something you have already written. Maybe there is a poem you started in response to one of the other prompts which you can develop using these ideas. If you don’t have any draft poems take some of the poems you think are finished and play around with them. Whatever comes up, you’ll still have the previous versions so you’ve got nothing to lose.

As always, do share your poems. They could be featured on the blog or a future podcast. You can send them here.

To learn more about Ramona and buy her books visit ramonaherdman.wordpress.com

Episode 12: Wesley Freeman Smith – The Art of Collaboration

Picture: Jules Leaño

Writing can be a lonely business but collaboration has always been at the heart of Wesley Freeman Smith’s practice. The Cambridge-based writer and artist began promoting events which brought together musicians, poets and visual artists in churches, basements and other grand and modest venues to perform, collaborate and share their creativity side-by-side.
From promoting others work he has stepped up to the mic himself on his latest project Catching Shadows a collaboration between himself and musician Theresa Elflein. Their debut release Fuse features Wesley’s abstract poetry set to music provided by guest collaborator Anna Schuschu.
Wesley talks about his latest project and working with artists across borders – artistic and geographical – to create art which is more than the sum of its parts.

Wesley also invites you to write a poem in response to one or more of these images he sourced for a ghost story writing project. You can hear a couple of his poems and one written by Patrick. Please share your own on social media using #poetrynonstop or via email here.

If you have enjoyed this podcast please help fund more episodes by donating via Patreon or Paypal. All contributions gratefully received.

Episode 11: Luke Wright – 20 years on stage

Luke Wright Picture: Andrew Florides

Luke Wright was a Blur fan and budding band frontman like so many of us in his teens. It was seeing Ross Sutherland and John Cooper Clarke perform poetry that set him on the path to a career in poetry. While he rejects the term performance poet he has excelled both in writing and performing. His poetry and blistering stage presence has impressed audiences around the world. As he put the finishing touches to his latest play The Remains of Logan Dankworth, Luke took time to look back on the first 20 years of his career sharing anecdotes and insights which are sure to inspire all poets, writers and performers. He also shares a few new poems.

For a writing prompt Luke challenges you to write a poem in 15 minutes:

Pick a word/phrase at random from a book. You don’t have to go with the first one you pick, but don’t spend all night on it, have three goes perhaps. Once you have your word or phrase set a clock for 15 minutes. In that time write a complete first draft of a poem. 

You can hear one of Luke’s poems that started from this speedwriting technique and find out how far Patrick got writing a poem in 15 minutes.

As always please share your poems which maybe featured on the blog or podcast. You can send them here.

www.lukewright.co.uk

If you have enjoyed this podcast please help fund more episodes by donating via Patreon or Paypal. All contributions gratefully received.